Saturday, February 19, 2011

Night of the Wind Chimes



I've always hated wind chimes, tinking away sadistically in the night.
I hear them now and they are the distance between us, they are shut out there with the lonely wind.
There are so many miles across this vast continent and they chime with the emptiness of a long distance train, rattling the freezing rails.
There are scattered lights across the prairies that go out one by one as midnight approaches.
There are peaks of ice as hard as granite, huddling and hidden and unforgiving in the twilight.
And there's a phone call that he's gone, passed away in the night, serenaded by wind chimes.

"Piggy back, piggy back," my daughter demands.
I carry her upstairs to the dark room and wonder if Jack is ascending a spiral staircase at the same time, finally free of his straightjacket body.
"Listen, Zara," I say as she picks herself up from a heap on the bed. "I have something to tell you."
"Grandpa Jack has died."
"Ok," she replies and there's a short pause. "Let's play soccer."
Let's leave the wind chimes out there in the night to play their solitary tune.

17 comments:

  1. "...tinking away sadistically in the night" ...priceless.
    Great metaphors, what a sweet story, David!
    And I just love when Zara gets involved in your stories.
    She's adorable!!

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  2. Beautifully expressed David, the emptiness and ache are palpable. My sympathy to your wife, yourself and your families.

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  3. I'm so sorry to hear of your father's death.

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  4. thanks Betty, I think it summed up my mood. Thanks Sue, you are too kind. Appreciate it Roses, Jack's my father in law, actually.

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  5. My sympathies to you and your wife, David. Jack, free of his straightjacket body--yes, indeed. That is how I would imagine it. His spirit is at last free. It's the same way I felt about my Mom when she passed. It was a relief that the struggle for her was finally over.

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  6. Very sorry to hear about your father-in-law David. May he rest in peace. My sympathies to your wife. My wife was a huge support to me when my dad passed. It's a tough role, the supporter. I wish you strength during this difficult time.

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  7. Thanks for your kind comments Daisy and Tim, I know you both have experienced the same thing recently

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  8. Thinking of you and your family at this time.

    What a great blog today, very much sums up your mood.

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  9. What a beautiful piece of writing out of a sad event. I have always liked windchimes but I can see why you would not.

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  10. I'll send you and your family some Maltesers and whatever other treats that are comfortfoody.

    I'm real sorry about Grandpa Jack.

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  11. Great post on a tender subject. I'm sorry for your loss, and I hope your piggy-back rider helps you find some comfort.

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  12. David, this post is very beautiful. I am very sorry for what you have lost your father-in-law. My heart goes out to you and your family.

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  13. That's such a beautiful, creative way to couch your father-in-law's death. I'm sorry for your loss.
    xoRobyn

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  14. I'm so sorry for you guys.

    Don't you love how children simply move forward? When did we forget how to do this?

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  15. Thanx Lidia, appreciate it. You are too kind, Frog. I think Maltesers would do the trick, Mollie. thanks JoLynne and thanks for the follo. thanks Olga, in a way it's a relief but it is sad. Cheers Robyn, just tried to describe my feelings without being too doom laden. I know, right, Deborah - a shrug of the shoulders and let's go out on my bicycle!

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  16. That was a better eulogy than what most people would say...sorry for your and your wife's loss...

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  17. Please accept my heartfelt sympathies for your loss.
    My thoughts are with you and your family.

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