Saturday, May 5, 2012

The Full Moon




Tonight there will be a "super full moon," the largest to be seen in almost 20 years. Sadly here in the city it will be obscured by street lights and wires and all of the inconsequential paraphernalia that relegates nature to a sideshow.

When I see it rising large over the buildings I will long for a grassy knoll far away in the countryside without a city wall where I can stand in the pale light of this lonely satellite.

Some people are affected by the moon. I have never thought much of this but I wonder now; I wonder if its light will illuminate a path somewhere.

 “The last full moon so big and close to Earth occurred in March of 1993,” Geoff Chester of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington D.C. told USA Today.


The Super Moon will appear especially large because the moment of perigee—when the moon is closest to the Earth in its monthly rotation—will coincide with the appearance of a perfectly full moon, apparently.

It's hard not to look at the moon and to feel shiver run through your body or to imagine the features of a perfectly well known stranger.

But Shelley should have the last word because Shelley had a way with words, even if his moon was no super moon but a frail and lonely fragment in a cold sea of cloud.


To The Moon

Art thou pale for weariness

Of climbing heaven and gazing on the earth,
Wandering companionless
Among the stars that have a different birth, -
And ever changing, like a joyless eye
That finds no object worth its constancy?




Percy Bysshe Shelley


13 comments:

  1. Lovely post David. Tonight's moon should be spectacular. Shelley certainly did have a way with words. Here's an excerpt from 'To A Skylark' which has a dreamy moon reference :
    The pale purple even
    Melts around thy flight;
    Like a star of heaven
    In the broad daylight
    Thou art unseen, but yet I hear thy shrill delight --

    Keen as are the arrows
    Of that silver sphere
    Whose intense lamp narrows
    In the white dawn clear
    Until we hardly see -- we feel that it is there.

    All the earth and air
    With thy voice is loud,
    As, when night is bare,
    From one lonely cloud
    The moon rains out her beams, and heaven is overflowed.

    Hope you get to enjoy this moon...even if you are stuck in the city.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great poem Tracy - love it, cloudy, though, sadly

      Delete
  2. hmm I may have to check out the moon tonight. I heard this was coming but didn't know when.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cool Alyson - I hope you got to see it

      Delete
  3. It's not looking good for us in coastal Massachusetts. Moonrise here is 7:38 pm but the forecast says partly cloudy with fog. :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know eh JoJo - was the same here. For some reason I thought you were on the west coast.

      Delete
  4. I think this deserves a drive to the country. With champagne. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. well to be fair I think every drive should involve champagne Jen

      Delete
  5. Very nice post, David. I'm hoping to see the moon tonight. I'm going to be up late chaperoning the after prom activities for my son's prom, so maybe I'll catch sight of the moon on the way there. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thanks Daisy - hope you got a glimpse

      Delete
  6. "Brits in the USA" has been included in this weeks A Sunday Drive. I hope this helps to attract even more new visitors to here.

    http://asthecrackerheadcrumbles.blogspot.com/2012/05/sunday-drive.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cool Jerry - I'll check it out thanks

      Delete
  7. That super full moon fell on an auspicious, religious day for some of us Hindus...so extra special attention for the moon. As it is, our part of the world marks imp days by the lunar calendar. Yes, we're all a little moony.
    Beautiful poem.

    ReplyDelete